Australian VTOL news

General stuff that gets thrown about when Helicopter Pilots shoot the Breeze.
Practice
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Practice » Tue Oct 13 2020, 00:30

hand in pants wrote:"President Trump’s attempts to play down the danger of the coronavirus pandemic for political reasons; has really backfired, as he is in hospital battling the virus - he claimed, ‘will not hurt you!’ As you read this, he has joined UK’s Boris Johnson as another one of the global leaders who has been struck down by the virus."

How has it backfired, this virus isn't as bad as the flu. If you look at the figures, the deaths that have been reported as a result of the China virus have been blown out of proportion. Doctors have been told that if someone dies for any reason and they have the virus, it is to be reported as a death due to the virus. So i would love to see how many passed away only because of the virus.
This virus is actually pretty harmless considering that 99% of people come out of it unharmed. So Trump isn't so wrong, more like he is dealing with facts and not media rubbish.


WTF has this got to do with helicopters or aviation? Hardly VTOL news is it?

Take your tin foil hat somewhere else. Facebook for example :cool_slp:
godfather007
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby godfather007 » Tue Oct 13 2020, 10:34

HIP has an armadillo shell hat like the dude in the Dukes of Hazard.
They have better punch on impact and protect the melon better.
Tin foil hats are a thing of the past, they compress and mould to the target, rendering the objective useless.
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hand in pants
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby hand in pants » Tue Oct 13 2020, 23:08

Practice, sounds like your tinfoil hat is on too tight. My post was in reply to rickshaw. Don't want to read other peoples reply's, scroll past, I won't mind.

And thanks godfather, I've always thought I looked pretty good in my armadillo hat.
Hand in Pants, I'm thinking, my god, that IS huge!!!!!!!!
rickshaw
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Wed Oct 14 2020, 10:38

Mustering operators are placing bets who will win the battle between El Niño and La Niña. Why?

More than half of the Australian Aircraft Helicopter Register is made up of Robinson helicopters. A major portion of these are engaged in the mustering industry. CASA data suggests the mustering group fly more hours than all other commercial activities during a drought free year. Australia's weather is influenced by many climate drivers. El Niño and La Niña have the strongest influence on year-to-year climate variability for most of the country. They are part of a natural cycle known as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The ENSO cycle loosely operates over timescales from one to eight years.

Best bet at present is La Niña which means: Increased rainfall across Australia, cooler daytime temperatures (south of the tropics), warmer overnight temperatures (in the north), a shift in temperature extremes, decreased frost risk, greater tropical cyclone numbers and earlier monsoon onset.

Increased rainfall means the cattle industry can recover from the recent devastating droughts. Eventually, cattle will need to be moved to better pastures, or to satisfy an increasing demand for Australian beef from China and Indonesia.

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) has predicted a wet summer. The La Nina conditions in the tropical Pacific are set to persist through summer. Most weather prediction models suggest the La Nina will strengthen, peaking in December. "Around half the models anticipate a strong event, meaning there is a possibility it could reach similar strength to the La Nina of 2010-12," BOM says in a statement issued on Tue 13 Oct 2020.

"However, models forecast this event will be shorter, possibly ending in the first quarter of 2021. "La Nina typically increases the chance of above average rainfall across much of Australia during spring," BOM says. "Above average summer rainfall is also typical across eastern Australia. Current climate outlooks indicate November 2020 to January 2021 will be wetter than average for much of the country.

Question? Who bets on El Niño or La Niña.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby godfather007 » Thu Oct 15 2020, 09:18

Q&A on BOM.. it’s a big Gamble.
How many times has a TAF or Area forecast been correct???
On my experience, 50/50.
Like I have said before, If I sucked at my job as bad as the BOM do, I would find another form of employment.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sun Nov 8 2020, 19:55

Urgent Update for our readers

Queensland Tender released 2 Nov 2020 and closes 13 Nov 2020.

The Queensland Government is seeking proposals for Aerial Services. It includes adding additional suppliers to the current aeroplane and helicopter arrangements to ensure coverage in all Geographical Areas.

Tender offer info: Aerial Services issued by Energy Queensland Limited. Number: 10553. UNSPSC 2: Passenger transport helicopters, includes power line operations. Combination of single engine piston and turbine helicopter. Also, a preference for twin engine turbines in some areas due terrain.

Regions. Cairns & Far North Queensland, Mount Isa & North West Region, The Central West, South West & Darling Downs, Townsville, Mackay Whitsunday Region, Rockhampton, Gladstone, Wide Bay Burnett and South East Queensland

More information available on Queensland website https://qtenders.hpw.qld.gov.au/

Best of luck!
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Thu Dec 10 2020, 18:27

Number of ATPL(H) trending down.

Source: CASA Annual Report 2019/2020.

Due to some unfinished work with the CASR Part 61 - Flight Crew Licensing - Multi-crew cooperation training, the number of training facilities capable of carrying out this training is limited in Australia at present. This has delayed some from choosing to upgrade their CPL(H) to ATPL(H). Note: MCC(H) is not required for an ATPL(H). However, if applying for a job on a heavier helicopter, depending on weight or flight manual concessions (or lack of), an MCC(H) maybe needed. An MCC(H) would probably cost around $7,000 to $8,000 due use of a non-motion simulator.

For example, the CASA Annual Report 2019/2020, the shows the following problem has continued since 2015 when the MCC (H) legislation became effective. In brief, there are 4,464 helicopter pilots of which only 654 now hold an ATPL(H).

Three years ago, there 4,387 pilots of which 782 held an ATPL (H). Thus, we have had a 16% decrease over three years which will worsen as the older pilots retire. The recent CASA Annual Report indicates the average age of helicopter pilots is around 52 years.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Yakking » Thu Dec 10 2020, 21:46

rickshaw wrote:Number of ATPL(H) trending down.

Source: CASA Annual Report 2019/2020.

For example, the CASA Annual Report 2019/2020, the shows the following problem has continued since 2015 when the MCC (H) legislation became effective. In brief, there are 4,464 helicopter pilots of which only 654 now hold an ATPL(H).

Three years ago, there 4,387 pilots of which 782 held an ATPL (H). Thus, we have had a 16% decrease over three years which will worsen as the older pilots retire. The recent CASA Annual Report indicates the average age of helicopter pilots is around 52 years.


OR there's only been a 3% decrease when you look at numbers in relation to how many pilots there are (both pilot numbers and ATPL holders went down).
That's the beauty about statistics, you can get them to reflect whatever you want them to.

What's your point?
I wish I had a catchy saying like everyone else...
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby av8r » Thu Dec 10 2020, 22:56

Yakking wrote:OR there's only been a 3% decrease when you look at numbers in relation to how many pilots there are (both pilot numbers and ATPL holders went down).
That's the beauty about statistics, you can get them to reflect whatever you want them to.

What's your point?


I think his point is that there has been a 16% decrease in the total number of ATPL holders but I'm not a rocket scientist.

You are also correct in that as a share of total licence holders the number of ATPL holders has only dropped 3% from 17% to 14% (but as a note to your statement, total pilot numbers went up as ATPL holders went down instead of both going down).

Both of your statements are correct but that is, as you say, the beauty of statistics. I think the point made in this report is that the ATPL decrease of 3% is not matched by the increase in total pilots of 1.5% over three years. While it may not seem significant in itself, it identifies a trend that will lead to ATPL holders becoming a progressively smaller fraction of total pilots if changes aren't made to the licencing process. Whether or not helicopter pilots need an ATPL at all is a different matter. ATPL holders tend to be older, thus more likely to retire in the next decade, and may have held an ATPL prior to changes in licencing that has made them harder to achieve. So from these points it can be inferred that the issue of total ATPL pilots decreasing will worsen over time.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Mag seal » Thu Dec 10 2020, 23:02

For example, the CASA Annual Report 2019/2020, the shows the following problem has continued since 2015 when the MCC (H) legislation became effective. In brief, there are 4,464 helicopter pilots of which only 654 now hold an ATPL(H).

Three years ago, there 4,387 pilots of which 782 held an ATPL (H). Thus, we have had a 16% decrease over three years which will worsen as the older pilots retire. The recent CASA Annual Report indicates the average age of helicopter pilots is around 52 years.[/quote]



I'd say way have way more ATPL H qualified pilots than jobs that require that licence at the moment, by a long way.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Eric Hunt » Fri Dec 11 2020, 03:28

Sometimes it is hard to understand the value of the ATPL.

I started out flying military two-pilot IFR choppers, (though the crew usually operated VFR), progressed to single-pilot VFR ops, then to SPIFR in twins. I have never held the ATPL. When I was working in Torres Strait, I flew the B412 SPIFR on day and night rescue missions, with a crewman next to me. But to step into the B412 parked next to it, run by Customs, I needed an ATPL, because there was a PILOT sitting next to me. And their operation was just cruising, looking at sensors, not rescue or EMS transport. Cruising. Horse's bum.

On the few times in my career when 2 pilots were specified for "safety reasons" (carrying the Governor-General, or Prince Harry, or night charter in a non-autopilot B212) I found that safety wasn't particularly enhanced because the pilots would talk about Old Times. Nothing ever went wrong, but the ATPL seemed to be a non-effective tool, especially now that CA$A has made it such a hurdle to negotiate.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Fri Dec 11 2020, 09:44

India’s rotorcraft industry is seeking a closer relationship with Australia’s helicopter and drone industries.

The Rotary Wing Society of India recently called the new Australian based Rotorcraft Asia-Pacific Business Association to discuss the global recovery from the coronavirus pandemic and other topics of mutual commercial interest within APAC. As a result, an online meeting with RWSI key players was held during August 2020. Air Vice Marshall K Sridharan, VM (G), retired, who is the editor of Rotor India, chaired the meeting.

One item of interest concern was the mountainous border between India and China. Both nations claim border intrusion incidents occur, which result in political protests. The current geopolitical situation due to tensions between China and the USA has some odd side effects. It is alleged China often threatens to impose trade embargoes with nations involved in politically orientated disputes.

One example was the threat to restrict the delivery of Chinese drones to India as a form of protest after a border incident. India's commercial drone fleet of more than one million is projected to grow by 12.4% per year during 2020-2026. It is claimed India relies upon China for the provision of drones and associated technology. One senior Indian spokesperson suggested there are probably around 30 million recreational drones in India. These are not required to be registered.

India like many nations in the Asia-Pacific region are concerned about their over dependence on China for the supply of complex aviation advanced technology and equipment may be suffocating their own R&D and industrial capability.

This explains the ‘Make in India’ advisories now being circulated to emphasise the need to seek other trading partners in the Asia-Pacific region. National leaders have clearly stated India needs to reduce its dependency on China’s expanding and very successful aviation manufacturing industry.

The Rotary Wing Society of India has 15 Honorary Members, 183 Corporate Members (including 90% of helicopter operators), and 1,257 Life Members. The strength of Life Members has grown steadily since the establishment of the Society. Most of these life members have made major contribution to Indian civil & military aviation and bring a great deal of corporate knowledge to the RWSI. More video conferences are planned prior to 2021. A list of Australian rotorcraft business companies and associations is being prepared by the Rotorcraft Asia-Pacific Business Association for the RWSI on behalf of their commercial, military and government membership.

International observers are puzzled by the lack of helicopters in a country which has more than 1.4 billion people. Data provided by the RWSI shows the civilian helicopter fleet is only 244. The Indian register shows private owners operate 37 helicopters. (six piston and 31 turbine). Non-scheduled operators: (charter) have five piston and 176 turbine machines for a total of 181. Government & public service agencies have 19 turbine and paramilitary seven.

There are 770 military helicopters in service with the Army Aviation Corps (191), Indian Air Force (474, Indian Navy Fleet Air Arm (84), and Coast Guard (21).

By comparison, Australia has 2,357 civilian helicopters and New Zealand 914 – a total of 3,271 or around 13 times more than India’s fleet.

However, Australia’s 160 military helicopters and NZ’s 15 airforce machines are outnumbered four to one by the Indian armed forces.

Russian Helicopters has announced India will buy 200 Ka-226T military helicopters from Russia. 140 will be manufactured in India under their Make in India project.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Gonsky » Fri Dec 11 2020, 10:42

The brains trust in AUS aka the liberal party has totally pissed off the Chinese side because "Scotty from advertising" was lead by certain US imbecile to make waves.

So you think stepping in and helping India in this Sh**fight is going to be a good idea?

Will not be much longer before the iron ore trade is cut and then game over.

Regards,
'Mankind has a perfect record in aviation - we have never left one up there!'
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Sat Dec 19 2020, 07:13

AAIB confirms helicopters collided mid-air in Taman Melawati – Malaysia.

The Air Accident Investigation Bureau's (AAIB) preliminary report of its investigation into a crash involving two helicopters in Taman Melawati in November confirms that a mid-air collision did occur, and investigators are now ascertaining how it happened and how it could have been prevented.

It appears two Guimbal Cabri G2 helicopters, had maintained a distance between 50m and 120m of each other at all times. "However, at 11.44am, the helicopters started to converge and collided a few seconds later," the report stated. The report also revealed a passenger in one helicopter had alerted its pilot, the other helicopter was getting closer.

The report also revealed that the two aircraft indicated in their flight plan that they would be "flying in company", which also raised questions among investigators. "A quick check into the local Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP) reveals that the only rule similar to what has been practised can be found under formation flights.

"Formation flying is without a doubt a discipline in itself... any lapse in discipline could lead to catastrophic results," it said.

The AAIB will be conducting further investigations. Meanwhile, the Civil Aviation Authority of Malaysia (CAAM) will look into making additional training a requirement for private clubs and operators, which is aimed at increasing awareness and competency among aviation enthusiasts.

The club had secured CAAM approval to offer Helicopters’ Private Pilot Licence - PPL (H) - training programmes to its members.

Condolences to those who lost loved ones.
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hand in pants
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby hand in pants » Sun Dec 20 2020, 12:15

hi gonsky, just to clear things up a bit, do you really think it's the Australian governments fault that china is acting like they are. and do you think we really should just cop their crap and suck it up.
do you think we should just let them charge tariffs on our goods and cut our sales into their country without trying to sell it elsewhere. I read somewhere that the Chinese public are suffering because there is millions of dollars worth of coal sitting off their coast and can't e used in their power stations. that's the type of trading partners we should be involved with.
Hand in Pants, I'm thinking, my god, that IS huge!!!!!!!!
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby skypig » Sun Dec 20 2020, 22:51

Thread creep for sure.
I, and many people I believe, agree with HIP.
The CCP have proven to be appalling trading partners.
Australia should move away from dealing with them. Nothing extreme or reactionary, just develop other markets and minimise interaction with this regime that shares few of our values. (None of our values as far as business ethics goes.)
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Gonsky » Tue Dec 22 2020, 05:54

Yep completely, Australia did absolutely nothing for years and totally sold the farm to China. Property, education, tourism, commodities etc etc one thing after another because it was easy money, never once thinking of the long term. Anyone ever stopped to think WHY Australia has not had a recession in 30yrs, China bought everything.

So while the country has destroyed all its manufacturing and relied on China to produce goods, it was also happy to sell all commodities to one major trading partner who is now just turning off one supply chain after another. Do you really think all of a sudden Australia is going to find trading partners to take up the slack on 100's of billions of dollars worth of trade?

So if the brains trust had any forward thinking they would have started down this track years ago, China didn't go off the rails last month they have been doing sh#t for over 20 yrs yet no one cared. China has run the same MO for years, invest in countries (belt and road) until they cannot survive without them. They are taking over the Pacific and Africa and the list goes on and on, how many politian's globally have been outed with the Chinese bag of cash.

You do realise China was trying to buy parts of the Australian electricity grid, Dictator Dan signed Vic up to deals using Chinese transformers and didn't even tell DFAT about it. So seems the govt is happy to keep playing the game. In 2018-19, Chinese companies supplied 29 of the 70 transformers imported by Australia, 16 were for use in Victoria.

So the point is why do MIL business with their enemies to make them cut off all trade, when the only real plan the govt has is lodge a complaint with the WTO. China must be sh#tting themselves.

The coal sitting in Chinese ports is Australian coal, Australia has actually supplied more Coal to China than last year. So add to the fact you have a global slowdown due to Covid and import quota's that reset every calendar year it is more likely they don't need it all. Now if that is not the case then it is an issue, not theirs but Australia's. Worried about the wellbeing of the locals is a bit of a stretch.

Sorry the business ethics comment was interesting, Australian banks launder billions of dollars that could be proceeds of child pornography, crime and people tracking and they get a fine and the stock goes up. 100's of companies in Australia are scamming the job keeper payments and no issues. Forced labor, every year 100's thousand of young travelers come to Australia and get paid 2$ an hour to get there holiday visa extended working on farms in the middle of nowhere. They cannot complain or they get screwed over, cheap labour. Payday lenders are making 400% on short term loans to people that should not be getting them, so I would have a think about the amazing business ethics here in Australia

We should have dumped china more than 10 years ago, but the Govt needed the hit. So it is nothing about taking crap is it about all of a sudden they are the enemy when they have been the bad guys for well over 50 yrs.

Regards,
'Mankind has a perfect record in aviation - we have never left one up there!'
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Eric Hunt » Tue Dec 22 2020, 06:25

Forced labor, every year 100's thousand of young travelers come to Australia and get paid 2$ an hour to get there holiday visa extended working on farms in the middle of nowhere. They cannot complain or they get screwed over, cheap labour.


Wentsky, you are so wrong.

Australian young people are so "entitled" that they will not entertain the thought of starting a job as a labourer, they feel that with their social media skills and the thousands of selfies and likes on Bookface, that they deserve to start as an executive.

Farmers are screaming for anybody to come and pick the fruit. Nobody comes, the fruit falls off the tree and is ploughed in.

Getting backpackers involved is the only way, but with Covid restrictions, nobody can travel. Sadly, the local people won't even go out onto the farm to do the work. Nothing to do with the government or China, purely the s#!t of the kids these days.
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby Gonsky » Tue Dec 22 2020, 06:29

They are not entitled they are just paid 50$ a hour to make coffee.

Australia's wage structures are so out of whack that a nurse doesn't even make that.

Regards,
'Mankind has a perfect record in aviation - we have never left one up there!'
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Re: Australian VTOL news

Postby rickshaw » Tue Dec 22 2020, 19:57

Understanding what is meant by APAC in relation to Australia and New Zealand’s rotorcraft interests.

Source: Australian Aviation in Focus by Rob Rich

Looking ahead to 2021 and beyond post COVID-19 there are enormous rotorcraft business opportunities in the Asia-Pacific (APAC) Region for Australian and New Zealand businesses interests located in a region where past predicated growth rates exceeded other global regions.

APAC comprises a collection of around 21 countries located in or near the Western Pacific Ocean. This includes Japan, East and South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Oceania. China is the largest country by area, followed by Australia, India, Indonesia, and Mongolia. The smallest country by is Macau. The region is home to some of the most populous countries. China has the largest population in APAC (and the world), with about 1.44 billion people. India follows closely, with 1.38 billion. The third-most populous country in the region and the fourth-most populous in the world, is our close neighbour Indonesia, with over 273.5 million people. The smallest by population is the British Indian Ocean Territory, which has just 3,000 people.

Industry commentators often ask for more precise figures on the helicopter industry in APAC. Data released at the Singapore Airshow in February 2020. Shows there an estimated 6,000 turbine engined helicopters in the region. The Australian and New Zealand helicopter figures were a surprise to many as these two countries with a combined population of only 30 million have more than 3,200 helicopters in an area encompassing India, Indonesia, Malaysia, China, Japan, and across to the Philippines; to name a few.

Australia’s Aircraft Register (Sep 20) had 13,396 aeroplanes and 2,357 helicopters for a total of 15,753 aircraft. Helicopters made up 15% of CASA aircraft registrations. Growth rate pre-Covid was only 2%, down from the traditional 4-6% per annum or twice the GDP.

New Zealand has a population of only 4.7 million, their aircraft register lists 5,401 aircraft of which 924 are helicopters, which make up 17% of the total. At present, New Zealand is recognised as a country with more helicopters ‘per head of population’ than any other. NZ has 5,086 people per helicopter; Australia follows with 10,808 and USA 13,880.

The Robinson Helicopter Company dominates the Australian register with 1,201 machines, or 52% of all helicopter registrations. The Robinson lead helicopter is the R22 helicopter (617), closely followed by the R44 (553), which will soon push the R22 back into second place.

Australia and New Zealand are well placed to provide manufacturing, training, and mentoring support to the large number of APAC countries which are presently poised to start an enormous rotorcraft expansion program once the global pandemic is brought under control. The 40 helicopter flying schools in Australia and another 10 in New Zealand would be hard pressed to meet the demand for pilots, technicians and administrative staff required by APAC regulators and the global insurance industry.

The Asia-Pacific airline boom over the past decade is a model worth studying!

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