DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Australian Helicopter Industry Association
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AUSTHIA
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DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby AUSTHIA » Wed Dec 11 2019, 22:38

This vital safety program is inspired by the Helicopter Association International (HAI) campaign, “Land and Live” launched in the USA in 2014.

Prior to this, previous HAI President and CEO, Matt Zuccaro’s favourite message was “Land The Damn Helicopter”

It is timely Helicopter Pilots are reminded of their responsibility of conducting their flights in a safe manner to protect themselves, their passengers and the community. If they become aware of any potential adverse issue, they should consider a landing.

There are many instances when a landing should be considered, rather than “Pushing It”. Some could be, but not limited to,
• Mechanical.....Abnormal instrument readings, strange noises, unusual vibrations, Caution/Warning lights. They could mean something.
• Fuel......Unsure if sufficient fuel is available to complete the flight. Better to land and call for a drum and pump...I know this is the best alternative.
• Weather.....Lowering cloud base, reduced visibility due to rain, dust, smoke. I have kept sheep and cattle company in the past.
• Daylight.....Insufficient daylight remaining to complete the flight. Most helicopters are wide enough to accommodate a six-footer.
• Passenger distress....There may be a situation when a passenger needs to be on the ground sooner rather than later.

Helicopter Pilots are fortunate...in an adverse situation a helicopter can land almost anywhere.

If you do consider a landing, advise ATC and activate your ELT. On landing, turn off your ELT and call the Australian Maritime Safety Authority on 02 62306899 or JRCC on 1800814931.

In the past Pilots have been reluctant to make a precautionary landing away from a designated landing area or aerodrome for fear they may have disciplinary action taken against them.

At Rotortech 2018, CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, stated “CASA will not take any disciplinary action against a pilot if they need to make a precautionary landing, provided it is performed in good faith, as safely as possible, and it did not endanger anyone”.

AHIA would like to acknowledge the support of ATSB, CASA and aviation safety proponent, Dick Smith who donated funds to AHIA to launch the “Don’t Push It-Land It” campaign.

FLY SAFELY ....DON'T PUSH IT - LAND IT!
godfather007
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby godfather007 » Thu Dec 12 2019, 04:59

YES to all of the above.

We need to spread the word and bolster it into all pilots brains.

This info will save life’s in the future.

Well done!!

GF
There is always an option.
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby Heliflyer » Thu Dec 12 2019, 07:07

Good advice.
ozloadie
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby ozloadie » Thu Dec 12 2019, 12:52

From someone who has done it, this is still and will be forever the best advice.

Although in a F/W into a ploughed paddock in '82, I had ATC calling me constantly offering assistance, even the deputy head of Civil Aviation on the radio.
Successful landing, flew it out in the morning and after landing attended a debrief where I was informed that another pilot 100 miles away pushed on and fatally crashed. Several weeks later I received a letter saying no further action would be taken and thanked me for using the system.

It does work and it works well if they know that you need their assistance.

New pilots and pilots who have never had to use the system before are often unsure as to whether their circumstances warrant that they should declare an emergency for the first time, and lose valuable time and space while procrastinating whether they will get into trouble or not for their call.
(This circumstance arose in mention a the recent Flying in the Wet safety forum)

If not sure (or embarrassed because the ego is still in the cockpit) literally say, "Aircraft Call Sign, Request assistance", and they will reply with " ATC Call Sign, how can we assist you?" and let them grade the response after they hear your circumstances.

There was a young pilot overseas once who was so scared he confused everyone by trying to use radiotelephone procedure formally to describe his circumstances and could not clearly describe what was happening. The controller told him to forget the procedure and use the radio like a telephone - instant fix and it worked.

A precautionary landing profile preserves the resources in hand that would be used up and not available if a forced landing profile was initiated after the opportunity to conduct the alternate earlier existed. That margin in itself would likely be critical. "Land a soon as practicable" or "Land immediately".
That should ring a bell! (or a Warning Caution Panel or two!)
Keep it flying, don't quit!
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Chang739
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby Chang739 » Thu Dec 12 2019, 22:45

It sounds like common sense, but the reality is it probably isn't. Good advice

Cheers,

Chang
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skypig
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby skypig » Sat Dec 14 2019, 00:29

Huey crash off Newcastle.
Perfect example, it would seem.
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby FerrariFlyer » Sat Dec 14 2019, 05:05

A few moons ago on an all day charter in the middle of the wet season I got caught out late one afternoon...

My passengers ran over their allotted time despite numerous 'firm, though polite' requests to pack things up. We set out with a small margin before last light for a short 15-20 minute flight home but we were inevitably forced to fly lower and lower and closer to the coast due to deteriorating weather. Before long, we were creeping up the beach low and slow in torrential rain when that part of you that regulates self-preservation said "it's time to land stupid".

It was a tough call as a very low hour guy however, it soon became a huge relief. We proceeded to a small island a few miles behind us that had some abandoned fisherman's huts and spent an uncomfortable night on some old beds and had some very old cans of baked beans for dinner. That said, we were alive!

To my utter shock, one of the passengers was a retired pilot himself and despite the lack of a night rating he badgered me to consider flying home in the dark - said he'd 'talk me through it'.

We flew home early the next morning tired, stinky but alive. Yes - the pride took a hit, but in the fullness of time it was a smart decision but honestly the ONLY decision to be made.
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BBwantok
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby BBwantok » Sat Dec 14 2019, 06:15

"At Rotortech 2018, CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, stated “CASA will not take any disciplinary action against a pilot if they need to make a precautionary landing, provided it is performed in good faith, as safely as possible, and it did not endanger anyone”

Since when has making a precautionary landing been an offence, or any of CASA's business?...
I have landed plenty of times due weather or for what ever reason.
If you have to be told this you shouldn't be flying...
bigboynasty
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby bigboynasty » Sat Dec 14 2019, 07:10

The Feds will say you should never have taken off in the first place. You haven't accessed the weather correctly as being suitable to fly to your intended destination.
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hand in pants
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby hand in pants » Sat Dec 14 2019, 19:55

Good advice.

But what has happened to self preservation. Why would anyone with any kind of brain push on into bad weather, beyond end of daylight or without enough fuel. surely there aren't that many dumb helicopter pilots out there.

And pressure from passengers/boss doesn't wash. No job is worth getting killed.

And as far as Shane Carmody is concerned, I would not trust or believe a word he says.
Hand in Pants, I'm thinking, my god, that IS huge!!!!!!!!
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby NZHelo » Sat Dec 14 2019, 23:35

hand in pants wrote:Good advice.

But what has happened to self preservation. Why would anyone with any kind of brain push on into bad weather, beyond end of daylight or without enough fuel. surely there aren't that many dumb helicopter pilots out there.

And pressure from passengers/boss doesn't wash. No job is worth getting killed.

And as far as Shane Carmody is concerned, I would not trust or believe a word he says.


One needs to look no further than the accident off Williamstown. By most accounts all of the above had something to do with it.
Getthereitis does strange things to humans.
Kind of like do not consume labels on poison. They are there but people still do.
Heliflyer
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby Heliflyer » Sun Dec 15 2019, 01:30

That's a great story, thanks for sharing. It's always easy to make rational decisions on the ground, or later in hindsight, but it's not always so easy when you're "out there" in the air. There are all sorts of subtle pressures on you to deliver and get to the destination, what will the boss say, what about the pax, etc. A great chief pilot is one of the best assets you can have when you make a call as PIC. Everyone's an expert after the event, but you're the one in the middle of whatever's happening. Good call FF!!


FerrariFlyer wrote:A few moons ago on an all day charter in the middle of the wet season I got caught out late one afternoon...

My passengers ran over their allotted time despite numerous 'firm, though polite' requests to pack things up. We set out with a small margin before last light for a short 15-20 minute flight home but we were inevitably forced to fly lower and lower and closer to the coast due to deteriorating weather. Before long, we were creeping up the beach low and slow in torrential rain when that part of you that regulates self-preservation said "it's time to land stupid".

It was a tough call as a very low hour guy however, it soon became a huge relief. We proceeded to a small island a few miles behind us that had some abandoned fisherman's huts and spent an uncomfortable night on some old beds and had some very old cans of baked beans for dinner. That said, we were alive!

To my utter shock, one of the passengers was a retired pilot himself and despite the lack of a night rating he badgered me to consider flying home in the dark - said he'd 'talk me through it'.

We flew home early the next morning tired, stinky but alive. Yes - the pride took a hit, but in the fullness of time it was a smart decision but honestly the ONLY decision to be made.
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skypig
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby skypig » Sun Dec 15 2019, 05:42

A great chief pilot is one of the best assets you can have when you make a call as PIC.


Amen!

Something that is all but lost in todays world.
Ever since the CP was renamed the MOFO, and retreated from the cockpit to the Head Office - any pilot expecting support is likely to suffer enormous disappointment.
NB If you don’t like the lack of support you receive for making an inconvenient safety decision, try being less safe and having a crash!! pop;

As an older, less bolder pilot I have landed many times rather than push on.
Quite frankly I don’t think about what anyone thinks or says - it’s 100% a PIC decision.*

I’ve had the (excellent) CP say (On the phone): “If/when it’s safe, fly to the nearest resort and buy everyone whatever they want - I’ll pay you back”. I’ve had the tower say: “Even if it clears there, don’t come here we are closed!” I’ve had the “Authority” ask why I landed in a sports oval in the centre of town”. My reply “for safety” was the last I heard of it.

Another thing to live by: If you do land: Do not take off again unless the reason you have landed has unequivocally changed for the better.**
“Looks like it might be slightly clearer” - should mean “We are staying here at this stage”
Too many tragic outcomes to back up this strategy!

*If there is any doubt, there is no doubt.
**It’s better to be on the ground wishing you were flying, than flying wishing you were on the ground!
8)
arrrj
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby arrrj » Mon Dec 16 2019, 19:03

I could not agree more.

I have landed many times and turned back many times, and every time I was happy with my decision.

Sure, my pax may not have been, but I calmly explained to them that it was important we all stay alive...

One memorable time was landing in Katoomba on an oval, waiting for the weather to clear to proceed (forecast said it would) and then turning back when it did not clear. The "other guy" in a nice shiny new Squirrel stuffed it into the trees - no doubt under pressure from the pax to make the great race.

If you are not happy about the flying conditions...say so, and either land or turn back.

Arrrj
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skypig
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Re: DON’T PUSH IT – LAND IT

Postby skypig » Mon Dec 16 2019, 22:44

A technique I’d recommend for anyone, especially newer pilots is to make it clear from the start (Before the flight) that the weather isn’t perfect and “getting through” is not guaranteed.

In arrj’s example - the Squirrels pax might have been told: “The weather on the hills is ‘marginal’, if you have to be there, by a deadline, perhaps you should drive”

This relieve some pressure when making the decision to land or turn back.

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