Obtaining an FAA Licence

Looking for some info on converting to or from an Aussie Flight Crew License?
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GOAIR
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Obtaining an FAA Licence

Postby GOAIR » Sun Jan 28 2007, 07:29

I'm plannig on heading over to the US and get a FAA ticket, can anyone recommend a good operator to complete the training with ??????
steve h
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Postby steve h » Sun Jan 28 2007, 16:51

Hello,
I was in the US for a while flying with Helicopter aventures in florida,not to bad,very busy which can be a bad thing some times.They also do JAR there as well.Also Vortex,my boss did a lot out in the US and spoke very highly of that school.


GOOD LUCK.


steve h.
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Postby GOAIR » Sun Jan 28 2007, 21:24

Thanks Steve
Uncle Chop Chop
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Postby Uncle Chop Chop » Mon Jan 29 2007, 00:11

GOAIR - Do you know what is involved in a FAA conversion? I believe it is a flight test and Air Law exam, is there anything else required? Instrument time ??

I'm looking at going over myself
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Postby six-three Bravo » Mon Jan 29 2007, 00:44

Try Helistream at John Wayne Airport on Orange County (the OC). A smaller school however very busy enviroment to fly in, especially up near LA. Pretty cool because you are taking off and landing on a roof top heliport and the circuit is in between high rise building adjacent to the airport. I even saw a Boeing 737 crash and wheels explode in flames whilst I was there. Remarkably no one was injured.

You will have to demostrate every part of their sybullus, as well as complete several X - country fights, 8 hours under the hood IFR, plus pass the theory. It can take between 20 - 30 hours flying before you can sit for a flight test. At least this is what I found.

When I arrived in the US (late 2000) I was under the impression that I had to simply pass a flight test and the theory exam (thats what I was told over the phone) but it was a bit more complicated than that. You have to get use to flying in their controlled airspace and understanding American airtraffic controllers speaking at a billion mph, just like in the movie "pushing tin".

Anyway check it out and do your research into how many hours will be required. You will need to be cashed up. Accommodation can be expensive.

Cheers


Six - Three Bravo
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Postby GOAIR » Mon Jan 29 2007, 06:04

thanks Six Three Bravo

Uncle Chop Chop - Six Three Bravo covers it all by the looks, might see you over there !!
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Postby TomOz » Mon Jan 29 2007, 07:55

I was under the impression that I had to simply pass a flight test and the theory exam (thats what I was told over the phone)


So how did they justify 20-30 hours + flight test??? I'm surprised that you're still recommending this mob, personally I would have been pretty pissed off!

:o
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Postby i4iq » Mon Jan 29 2007, 18:43

There's loads of good places to choose from...

What kind of visa are you going to get? Some schools offer different opportunities based on their approval.

Getting used to ATC doesnt take long, although its a little more complicated IFR in Class B airspace.
Cheers

i4iq

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Postby six-three Bravo » Mon Jan 29 2007, 21:44

the 20 -30 hours was because as I previously stated I was told you had to demostrate and complete every part of their sybullus before being allowed to sit for a flight test, so if you didn't have 8 hours IFR under the hood, you had to do this plus some hours night VFR flying, you had to complete several x -country flights in US airspace and controlled zones, as well as demostrate multiple autos, ground contact included, 180 / 360 autos, confined areas, slope landings, jammed controls etc, etc, etc. Of course this was for CPL (H) conversion. I got a US PPL the 2nd day I was there.

You are flying in one of the most conjested airspaces in the world so once you experience it was understandable that they didn't want people who didn't know where they were going charging around LA and Orange County. I still haven't found the bloody LA River, it is a goddam concrete storm water drain, but the seppos call it a river. I eventually found on my 10th flight.

I might of been ripped off but i found Helistream instructors very professional, however very busy. Once your debrief is finished no time for chit chat, they are onto their next student. Plus they charge for every minute they spent on the ground with you which i haven't encountered in Australia.

I would be interested in other people's expereince with doing a conversion in the US. I rocked up with about 250 hours. They offered me a job an an instructor once I finished all my training however I came back to Aussie because I thought I had a job flying a B206 which turned out to be a hoax. But you live and learn.


Cheers

six - three bravo.
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Postby Uncle Chop Chop » Mon Jan 29 2007, 23:30

Six Three Bravo - Hey mate, would you know from your experience if you can go straight into an Instructor rating or do you have to first convert to FAA CPL then onto intructor rating ??

Once you have the Instructor rating it seems that you can find work relatively easy ??
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Postby "The Yank" » Tue Jan 30 2007, 09:38

Chop Chop,

You'll need to have a CPL before you go for CFI in the U.S. Here is a link for the requirements:

http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory_an ... enDocument

Just do a web search for FAA regulation Part 61.183 if the link does not work.

I don't think there are any hour requirements for the CFI rating. However, you'll need an instructor sign off and they won't sign you off unless you are proficient. When I did my CFI rating at Palm Beach Helicopters at Lantana airport (West Palm Beach) I had a week of class learning how to teach and then 6.5 hours flight training. Randy Rowles was my instructor (best I've ever had), but he is now working for Bell in Dallas. I think he still owns the school though.

I stopped in at Vortex (at their old location, which was wiped out by the hurricane) for some maintenance once. I met Joe (the owner) and he was very nice. He seemed like a laid-back "good 'ol boy." The students I talked with said they liked the school.

LA can be overwhelming airspace (I flew there once). You don't need to go train there to get good at communications. There are busy airports all over the U.S. South Florida has many tower controlled airports clustered together. It will give you a workout, but it's not as crazy as LA.

Hope this helps!

Yank
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Postby Ray McCooney » Tue Jan 30 2007, 10:41

Not looking at going there myself. I do have some questions though!
What sort of working visa are you guys going into the states with? or are you just over there for fun? Surely you cant just nip over to the USA convert your licence and start working. Or am I missing something?
The last time I was in the states for holidays the Immigration staff were pretty full on, so make sure you know what visa you need, otherwise they WILL send you packing!

I can understand getting the FAA licence if you need to fly a N reg Helicopter some place else on the planet.
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Postby Uncle Chop Chop » Wed Jan 31 2007, 03:28

Thanks Yank :D good advice, I'll need it....

Ray - I'm going on a 90 day Visa, which doesn't allow working rights in the US, however there is a J-1 Visa program that allows working rights and a M-1 Visa but can't use that for work, but can use for training purposes.

I'm going over as part holiday, part check out the job scene, never been overseas before so looking forward to it.
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Postby i4iq » Wed Jan 31 2007, 17:48

You'll need 200 hours in the US to instruct in the R22.

Dont forget that there is a limit to the rating you can have to be eligible for the J1. I believe it is up to 150 hours but no commercial license. It is highly unlikely to get work without a genuine J1 or M1.

I went the J1 route which is working fine so far! If anyone has any specific questions I'd be happy to help where I can.
Cheers



i4iq



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Postby PhilJ » Wed Jan 31 2007, 17:56

Where you convert may depend on what exactly you want to do with your FAA license, I trained at HAI in Florida and now work in the LA area, much busier ATC in LA but that is probably a hinderance if you want to get it done asap unless you specifically want to work in the LA area.

For the CPL you need 10 hours instrument training (not sure where the 8 is coming from, do you already have 2 from the CASA license?) Also 5 hrs solo night. Full details in 61.129 (c)

Seems we are all assuming you want a CPL , for private its dead easy see 61.75 though it may be endorsed no night if you haven't got night training.

six-three bravo, did you receive any training from Rod Anderson? You are right about the LA river, LA Open Sewer might be a better description but I guess it doesn't sound as good.

Phil
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Postby GOAIR » Wed Jan 31 2007, 20:33

Hey Phil,

Do you have a web address or contact details of HAI ???
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Postby PhilJ » Thu Feb 1 2007, 03:31

yeah goair , its a tricky one: www.heli.com
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Postby GOAIR » Thu Feb 1 2007, 05:14

Thanks
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Re: Obtaining an FAA Licence

Postby Little Bird » Mon Jun 18 2012, 07:47

G'day all,
Has anyone trained on the east coast (will be based in New Jersey) and has a recommendation for a school to convert my licence?
Ta
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Re: Obtaining an FAA Licence

Postby 4real » Mon Jun 18 2012, 12:39

Check out Manu Loa heli's in hawaii, they can issue your training visa which is a bigun. instructor rating, expect 30+k to complete. instrument rating and instructor/instument rating seems to be the requirement form my research to be able to get a job as an instructor, haven't looked much further than that into it.

ps, haven't had time to read all the post proor to this.


forgive me , too busy flying>>>>>

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