European pilots in Australia

General stuff that gets thrown about when Helicopter Pilots shoot the Breeze.
deg0209
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European pilots in Australia

Postby deg0209 » Sun Feb 11 2018, 09:36

Hi all,

I’m a 26 year old, with a fresh EASA CPL(H) in the hand. Because of the bad job situation for low time pilots here in Europe I’m thinking to moving to Australia, hoping the situation is better there.
So I’m looking on that way to get some contacts from other European pilots in Australia who can reply some of my questions.
Maybe somebody knows, who somebody knows who can help me? :wink:

Thank you in advance for your help!
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havick
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby havick » Sun Feb 11 2018, 14:50

Do you have the ability to gain residency in Australia? If not that will be your first hurdle.
"You'll have to speak up, I'm wearing a towel."
plumber
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby plumber » Sun Feb 11 2018, 15:25

I don't think your dilemma is just a European one. Globally there is a small need for low time pilots and the situation does not look to be improving soon.
deg0209
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby deg0209 » Sun Feb 11 2018, 19:46

havick wrote:Do you have the ability to gain residency in Australia? If not that will be your first hurdle.


Thanks for your information.
No I haven't! Because of such things, I would like to speak with a pilot who already walked through all this hurdles.
Until now I only checked out the CASA homepage to get some information how to convert my license and it seems not to be so complicated.


plumber wrote:I don't think your dilemma is just a European one. Globally there is a small need for low time pilots and the situation does not look to be improving soon.


You're right. But here in Europe we haven't these sightseeing, tourism jobs with helicopters like the R44, which you can find in Australia or USA. And I think these jobs would be the best way to start a career.
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Couch Monster
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby Couch Monster » Sun Feb 11 2018, 20:55

I think most low hour jobs in the industry are competitive. Are you able to work as a pilot on a Holiday work visa? I would imagine that most Australian citizens would get a 'first look-in' over foreigners, if you have similar hours/endorsements?

I knew becoming a helicopter pilot wouldn't be easy.
My brain told me to go FW. My heart said RW.
I will have to live with the fall-out of this decision in the future (maybe) - Once I've completed my commercial licence :|
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Skeeter
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby Skeeter » Sun Feb 11 2018, 20:57

I can give you some advise regarding the licence conversion but like the others wrote, you have to sort your working rights first. No one is going to sponsor a low time pilot.
Saying that, you won't get a visa without having the Australian licence...

You will need to invest roughly 20.000 € or more to get the licence and visa. Only then you can start to apply for jobs.
At anytime, the visa rules can change or pilot can be removed from the list.

If you're lucky and get the visa, you're hopefully not broke yet, cause you will need more cash to do the trip to show your face to the operators.
Sending CVs like in Europe is not the way to score a job over there.

If your only motivation is the job market, I wouldn't bother. If you have other reasons.. go for it.

On the good side, the market in Europe isn't that bad. The offshore operators are ramping up and co pilot jobs are advertised now and then.
You have to have your IR ready though.
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby Thorsen » Sun Feb 11 2018, 21:14

Hiya,

I’m a Norwegian flight instructor working in Melbourne. Came here about a year ago. Got the job because I was visiting a friend and contacted companies around the place asking to have a chat about the industry in Australia. I would recommend you do the same thing. I’ve had a few friends rent cars and drive all around Australia just visiting companies and showing face.

The priority is a visa. If you can prove that you can get an Australian license then go for it. I was lucky enough to get a resident return visa because I used to live in Perth.

The conversion itself was pretty easy. Casa require you to do two multiple choice exams: Human Performance and an overseas license conversion exam (which is just air law and you can bring all the books into the exam with you) and one practical exam. Before you can do those, you’ll need an ARN number and a CASA medical class 1.

I find the industry here is much better than in Europe but I haven’t been over there to see what it’s like anymore. All I know is that all of our cpl students have been able to get jobs all around the country. You just need to convince a company why they should hire you over an Australian in the same boat.

Hope this helps! If you have any more qs then feel free and I’ll answer to the best of my ability.
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havick
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby havick » Sun Feb 11 2018, 21:57

deg0209 wrote:
havick wrote:Do you have the ability to gain residency in Australia? If not that will be your first hurdle.


Thanks for your information.
No I haven't! Because of such things, I would like to speak with a pilot who already walked through all this hurdles.
Until now I only checked out the CASA homepage to get some information how to convert my license and it seems not to be so complicated.


plumber wrote:I don't think your dilemma is just a European one. Globally there is a small need for low time pilots and the situation does not look to be improving soon.


You're right. But here in Europe we haven't these sightseeing, tourism jobs with helicopters like the R44, which you can find in Australia or USA. And I think these jobs would be the best way to start a career.



You would be better going to the USA doing your instructor rating and stay on teaching. I forgot which visa exactly that is but there’s many before you who bolt up hours this way and then went back to EuropeZ
"You'll have to speak up, I'm wearing a towel."
plumber
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby plumber » Mon Feb 12 2018, 10:55

Quote "I would imagine that most Australian citizens would get a 'first look-in' over foreigners, if you have similar hours/endorsements?"

Not if Australia is anything like Canada. It's amazing the greed of a lot of these owners. It's all about what you are willing to do for longer days/tours and less pay.
deg0209
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby deg0209 » Mon Feb 12 2018, 13:50

Skeeter wrote: On the good side, the market in Europe isn't that bad. The offshore operators are ramping up and co pilot jobs advertised now and then.
You have to have your IR ready though.


For this jobs you need an instrument raiting. The requirement in Europe for the IR are:
40h instrument time + 18 hour in a twinengine helicopter, which are at least 1.800€/h (2.800 AUD) x 18 = 32.400 € (50.400AUD) . . . just for the 18h in the twinengine!
And for most of this copilot jobs they are still asking 300 - 400 hours flight time.



havick wrote:You would be better going to the USA doing your instructor rating and stay on teaching. I forgot which visa exactly that is but there’s many before you who bolt up hours this way and then went back to EuropeZ


You need a F1-Visa. Only two flight schools in the US can give the F1-Visa. And I guess they give it only to those students who make the complete CPL program in there school. So that ship has sailed already for me.. :wink:
To get an other working permit in the States is nearly impossible!



I try only to get some contacts in Australia and to check the situation there, before I start to spend time and money in an Australian CPL and working permit!
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby FerrariFlyer » Mon Feb 12 2018, 19:51

deg0209 wrote:

For this jobs you need an instrument raiting. The requirement in Europe for the IR are:
40h instrument time + 18 hour in a twinengine helicopter, which are at least 1.800€/h (2.800 AUD) x 18 = 32.400 € (50.400AUD) . . . just for the 18h in the twinengine!
And for most of this copilot jobs they are still asking 300 - 400 hours flight time.



I’d hate to see what the the final figure is from ‘start of training to IFR qualifications’ as a copilot in Europe these days. Sadly, the local industry is going the same way, or so it would seem.

Good luck with your licence change over and job hunting.
Zac Henderson
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby Zac Henderson » Tue Feb 13 2018, 11:58

You are correct in your analysis that Australia offers more opportunity for entry level Pilots as it has the tourism work and various other positions on offer which are more suitable/obtainable for low hour pilots.

As you are aware and mentioned above a Visa would be your biggest obstacle. To my knowledge there's always the option of going on a 12 month working/holiday visa and finding a job as ground crew. In that 12 months you can do your 88 days I think it is in a rural area to gain your 2nd year working visa. By this stage you have had the opportunity to work as ground crew for up to 21 months, grasp the industry and make connections in Aus. Might sound like a long road but just trying to think outside the square a little. Nothing ventured nothing gained. You have an EASA CPL(H) so Im assuming you have at least 180 hours including 10 hours instrument and 5 night? So in that regard you would be a little in front of an Australian CPL(H) holder straight out of a licence with 100 or 150 hours.

Where in Europe are you? I Know of a company in the UK that may have a position available doing scenic flights. R44 but mostly B206.

Pm me if you wish re. Details.
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Re: European pilots in Australia

Postby Fill-level » Tue Feb 13 2018, 23:28

Zac Henderson wrote:You are correct in your analysis that Australia offers more opportunity for entry level Pilots as it has the tourism work and various other positions on offer which are more suitable/obtainable for low hour pilots.

As you are aware and mentioned above a Visa would be your biggest obstacle. To my knowledge there's always the option of going on a 12 month working/holiday visa and finding a job as ground crew. In that 12 months you can do your 88 days I think it is in a rural area to gain your 2nd year working visa. By this stage you have had the opportunity to work as ground crew for up to 21 months, grasp the industry and make connections in Aus. Might sound like a long road but just trying to think outside the square a little. Nothing ventured nothing gained. You have an EASA CPL(H) so Im assuming you have at least 180 hours including 10 hours instrument and 5 night? So in that regard you would be a little in front of an Australian CPL(H) holder straight out of a licence with 100 or 150 hours.

Where in Europe are you? I Know of a company in the UK that may have a position available doing scenic flights. R44 but mostly B206.

Pm me if you wish re. Details.



Yes that is true , if you have the legal right to work in Australia permanently , given a choice for an Australian employer 1.. A CPL holder with a Working holiday visa or 2 A CPL holder with a permanent Visa, the extra hours won't help

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