Airborne Video Recorders, Cameras, and Systems

Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late finals...

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FerrariFlyer
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Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late finals...

Postby FerrariFlyer » Tue Jan 20 2015, 12:52

What are the chances of a failure at this very unfortunate point in time?

http://aerossurance.com/helicopters/s-7 ... ing-video/
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby Heliduck » Tue Jan 20 2015, 22:23

..and what's the thought process behind ditching a twin into the ocean when you are just about over the pad? I would have auto'd a single onto the ship from there before I went into the ocean, with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight sitting in my office of course.
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby Twin Head » Tue Jan 20 2015, 22:33

Hmm, must of been heavy as well
agpilot7
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby agpilot7 » Tue Jan 20 2015, 23:53

From the arm chair HEAVEY does seem to cover it
purplecircle
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby purplecircle » Wed Jan 21 2015, 03:59

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Hello Pilots
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby Hello Pilots » Wed Jan 21 2015, 05:08

She didn't take long to start filling with water
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Eric Hunt
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby Eric Hunt » Wed Jan 21 2015, 07:32

The large RPM drop would cause the tail rotor RPM to decay too, with a big yaw - note that the camera swung off target as soon as the noise went down.

Surprised that the second engine didn't pick up the load, an RPM drop like that shouldn't happen. The good engine should go to Blow-Away power to save the day.
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby Firefish » Wed Jan 21 2015, 09:01

Not sure if their SOP is to ditch instead of try and land on the deck in the event of an engine failure but that approach didn't seem to give them any other option.
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Heli
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby Heli » Wed Jan 21 2015, 20:09

FerrariFlyer wrote:What are the chances of a failure at this very unfortunate point in time?


Very high chance: power is coming in after loafing along in the cruise and if an engine is going to fail then that is the time. One of my engine failures was on short finals to the WTC pad on the Yarra when pulling power, which leads to the next observation that the approach was too flat and gave no chance of reaching the helipad when the brown stuff reaches the whirling blades. I try to make all confined area approaches such that I can auto in at any stage: it worked when I needed it!
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby kite addict » Thu Jan 22 2015, 06:13

hmm the video has been removed by the user!!
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bladepitch
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby bladepitch » Thu Jan 22 2015, 10:42

Still out there...

This link is provided on the same page 4 lines beneath original you tube link which has been removed.

http://m.liveleak.com/view?i=913_1417448165
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FerrariFlyer
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby FerrariFlyer » Thu Jan 22 2015, 13:22

Firefish wrote:Not sure if their SOP is to ditch instead of try and land on the deck in the event of an engine failure but that approach didn't seem to give them any other option.


I would imagine there to be few operators who would have an SOP to automatically ditch following an engine failure however there are obviously SOPs for when an aircraft has no other option but to ditch and what the subsequent actions should be. I agree that the approach did not look to be ideal.

In the 'unlikely' event of an engine failure on late finals, the call of 'committed' is made when the pilot flying no longer believes that they can safely fly away in the event of an engine failing. If a good approach has been flown, all things being equal, the aircraft should be able to safely make it to the deck on one engine, or, be positioned to make the best possible attempt to fly away prior to the committal call. There are obviously many variables involved which dictate if the approach is flown differently from one platform to another and the crew on any given day normally conduct a reasonably thorough brief on how each approach will be completed.

With respect to the 'ideal approach', which can be a somewhat subjective matter, depending on type the aircraft should ideally be manoeuvred such that, at or very close to the committal call being made, ROD should be minimal, GS around 10 knots, main rotor blades coincidental with the deck or platform edge and at a height appropriate for the type above the deck.

Further, it must be remembered that some machines may not have a huge power margin for the final approach and in a perfect world, a perfectly flown approach may still result in some exposure time where a safe landing on one engine may not be made.
Firefish
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Re: Overseas S76 engine failure offshore on late, late final

Postby Firefish » Thu Jan 22 2015, 20:04

FerrariFlyer wrote:
Firefish wrote:Not sure if their SOP is to ditch instead of try and land on the deck in the event of an engine failure but that approach didn't seem to give them any other option.


I would imagine there to be few operators who would have an SOP to automatically ditch following an engine failure however there are obviously SOPs for when an aircraft has no other option but to ditch and what the subsequent actions should be. I agree that the approach did not look to be ideal.

In the 'unlikely' event of an engine failure on late finals, the call of 'committed' is made when the pilot flying no longer believes that they can safely fly away in the event of an engine failing. If a good approach has been flown, all things being equal, the aircraft should be able to safely make it to the deck on one engine, or, be positioned to make the best possible attempt to fly away prior to the committal call. There are obviously many variables involved which dictate if the approach is flown differently from one platform to another and the crew on any given day normally conduct a reasonably thorough brief on how each approach will be completed.

With respect to the 'ideal approach', which can be a somewhat subjective matter, depending on type the aircraft should ideally be manoeuvred such that, at or very close to the committal call being made, ROD should be minimal, GS around 10 knots, main rotor blades coincidental with the deck or platform edge and at a height appropriate for the type above the deck.

Further, it must be remembered that some machines may not have a huge power margin for the final approach and in a perfect world, a perfectly flown approach may still result in some exposure time where a safe landing on one engine may not be made.


I was being generous FF as I cannot imagine why these guys flew this approach. As to flying a perfect approach and still not being able to land safely, try telling that to the judge. If you're within your weight limits for the operation and fly your profile correctly then you should be able to land safely.

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