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A place to have your say and ask your questions on anything in the Helicopter learning environment.
WestOz
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Postby WestOz » Sat Nov 30 2019, 11:34

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Last edited by WestOz on Sun Dec 1 2019, 09:36, edited 1 time in total.
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havick
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Re: Hover turns/Hover taxi

Postby havick » Sat Nov 30 2019, 22:09

Force yourself to look further into the distance and use your peripheral vision more.
"You'll have to speak up, I'm wearing a towel."
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skypig
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Re: Hover turns/Hover taxi

Postby skypig » Sat Nov 30 2019, 22:25

Try to make sure you aren’t pushing on both pedals (tensing up).
Eg 15kg on the left pedal, 14.9kg on the right for a left turn. (You can relearn this technique once you are flying an AW139/189....)

As above, keep the eyes up and use the pedals to make it do what you want.
Anticipating the wind will help. “I’m pushing the tail into the wind, soon I’ll go past “tail wind”, the I’ll be resisting the wind speeding up the yaw.”
More pedal to push the tail, then quite suddenly, less pedal is required.
Vortexsting
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Re: Hover turns/Hover taxi

Postby Vortexsting » Sat Nov 30 2019, 22:42

I would say relax! Don’t overthink the wind just feel the machine and where the cyclic wants the pressure.

Practice pedal turns just using one foot on the power pedal.

Also the great thing about learning to fly is, it’s not a race!
Sonofapitch
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Re: Hover turns/Hover taxi

Postby Sonofapitch » Sat Nov 30 2019, 22:55

If you haven’t already tried this...Maybe suggest to your instructor if you can begin the lesson with holding a 3 foot hover into wind, then climb to a 20-30 foot hover and hold, maintaining position over ground, don’t allow to drift or yaw. Then descend back to a 3 foot hover, really focusing on holding position over ground and not allowing it to yaw when power is increased or decreased. Continual repetition of this manoeuvre will help to develop/refine required motor skills. Once mastered give same manoeuvre a crack crosswind & downwind.... and like already suggested. Eyes out front.

Relax & be patient. It will come.
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Hello Pilots
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Re: Hover turns/Hover taxi

Postby Hello Pilots » Sun Dec 1 2019, 02:25

Yeah try telling the instructor how you think the lesson plan should be. I’d of loved being told by a student how to do my job.
Or, they should not be milking you by going out in 18kts.
Fill-level
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Re: Hover turns/Hover taxi

Postby Fill-level » Sun Dec 1 2019, 02:45

Hello Pilots wrote:Yeah try telling the instructor how you think the lesson plan should be. I’d of loved being told by a student how to do my job.
Or, they should not be milking you by going out in 18kts.


:D
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Eric Hunt
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Re: Hover turns/Hover taxi

Postby Eric Hunt » Sun Dec 1 2019, 05:43

Hover comprises 3 things, in this order:
Make it POINT - keep some distant feature between your toes. If it goes under one toe, squeeze that toe until the feature is back in the middle. If you can't control the way you are pointing, you cannot have a successful hover.
Keep it FLAT - the basic hover attitude is flat in the window, at some point up the canopy bow (depends on your height, and the headwind). Remember where the hover attitude is for that day/wind/fat instructor etc, it changes every day, but is basically the same.
Fix the HEIGHT. Last thing to do. Make small lever changes, and wait for the effect to come in.

Once you have the basic hover steady, then it is just cyclic PRESSURE to stop or start any movement over the ground.

When your instructor is teaching you hover turns, he/she/it will get you to do it one control at a time:
Pedal first, to learn to control the rate of turn, anticipate max pedal input as you go through 90 degrees x-wind, then ease it off as you get tail into wind, then maybe as the tail comes through the next 90 you actually have the opposite pedal input, to control how fast it whips around.
Cyclic next, and gaining the feel of keeping pressure on the stick into wind -basic hover attitude, plus forward pressure, then sideways, backwards, sideways again, and forward, holding position over the ground.
Lever last, coz this is the easiest.
Then pedals and lever, lever and cyclic, then all together.
bigglesbutler
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Re: Hover turns/Hover taxi

Postby bigglesbutler » Sun Dec 1 2019, 07:38

If it's any consolation I am learning to fly an R44 after 6000hrs in complex machines, AS332, EC225, S61 and now the AW139. Can I hover the R44?????????? can I F!$RK.
I am over controlling the aircraft as I am so used to letting the automation do it for me I have forgotten the light touch required, slightly different to you but my solution may help. As has been said before relax and stop over controlling. I am trying to do this by lifting my right foot just off the right pedal and getting a feel for how that works in a hover, then relaxing the death grip on the cyclic.

I feel for you, actually having to fly a machine rather than point robby the robot (autopilot) in the right direction is HARD :D.

Si
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Eric Hunt
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Re: .....

Postby Eric Hunt » Sun Dec 1 2019, 10:18

Biggles, I feel for you: I had flown over 7000 hrs in turbine machines before strapping on an R22, and for the first 2 endorsement rides (first piston type was a 5-hr minimum) it just defeated me. How could such a flimsy piddling thing be so twitchy and responsive? I fretted after the first day, but after the second beer, while wondering whether this huge leap of faith and change of career was a horrible mistake, I just thought this: It is just another helicopter. Get on with it and fly the forking thing.

So, next day I put it on and wrung its little neck. Flew about 1300 hrs in the R22, before taking another fork in the forking road and leaving it behind.

When I saw a student squeezing the buttons out of the stick, I would take over and show how to hover the aircraft with one finger on the top of the cyclic, one foot (right) on the pedals, and left hand and left foot in the air (small bit of collective friction). The feel is that light.

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