Instructor rating theory

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tail wind
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Instructor rating theory

Postby tail wind » Sun Dec 30 2018, 09:20

Gidday All,

I’m looking at getting my instructor rating in the new year, but wanting to knock the theory over before I get stuck into it. Does anyone have any information/advice on which theory books are worth studying?

Thanks in advance

TW
RotorBez
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby RotorBez » Sun Dec 30 2018, 10:50

tail wind wrote:Gidday All,

I’m looking at getting my instructor rating in the new year, but wanting to knock the theory over before I get stuck into it. Does anyone have any information/advice on which theory books are worth studying?

Thanks in advance

TW


Not sure where you are based but then again i'm not sure it makes that much difference. I have provided some content assuming you are looking at doing your CASA *(Australia) Grade III. If so then you would do well to start reading through;

https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policie ... 083-9A.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policie ... 8083-4.pdf

Both of the above are FAA books but are pretty good publications if honest. You also need to start going through;

https://www.casa.gov.au/files/fimhpdf

Where are you doing your Instructor rating? What options have you looked at re training locations?

All the best with it.

RB
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Helicoil
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby Helicoil » Sun Dec 30 2018, 21:19

The last time I checked with CASA, self-study then exam was not an option - you had to attend a PIRC course prior to sitting the exam. Hope this helps 8)
tail wind
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby tail wind » Mon Dec 31 2018, 02:59

Thanks for the info Rotor Bez, I’ve started on the FAA instructor book but wasn’t sure if that was sufficient, I’ll keep going with that along with the CASA material. You’re correct, it’s the initial grade 3 I’m going for.

In terms of a school, I will have to relocate regardless so I’m looking into schools that potentially take on a g3 once you have completed your training, but I’m well aware this is never a guarantee.

I’ll have to look into that Helicoil, I was under the impression you could sit the exam whenever, and do a PMI/cert 4 course at a later stage when you begin the actual course, but that could well be wrong. I was trying to get through whatever I could whilst still working in the current job but that may be wishful thinking!
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Helicoil
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby Helicoil » Mon Dec 31 2018, 08:28

I don't really know if doing the exam first, then course second, is valid, only that a pass in the exam does not constitute a completion of the theory component.
bl@ckers
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby bl@ckers » Mon Dec 31 2018, 11:18

Helicoil wrote:I don't really know if doing the exam first, then course second, is valid, only that a pass in the exam does not constitute a completion of the theory component.


Curious to see where you are getting your information from? Is this a new requirement?

As far as I am aware, you can sit the PIRC independent of the instructor rating course. I am unaware of anything that says otherwise in Part 61. It is no different to comppleting all CPL theory first and then going to a part 141 school to do the practical.

I did the exam first and was then able to focus solely on the course at a later date. The PIRC is essentially an exam on PMI and the FAA handbook has everything that you need..... although this may have changed recently as most exams appear to have been rewritten?!?
109ish
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby 109ish » Mon Dec 31 2018, 22:31

You are both correct in a way … but to be specific - 61.1185 Requirements for grant of flight instructor rating;
(4) The applicant must also:
(a) have completed an approved course of training in principles and methods of instruction; or
(b) hold a Certificate IV in Training and Assessment; or
(c) hold a tertiary qualification in teaching.

If you need a PMI course then that means you are not a teacher and don't have a Cert IV. The "course of training in principles and methods of instruction" should cover some or all of the elements of the PIRC test. So it's reasonable to assume you are better off doing the PMI course prior to the PIRC test - but the order is not mandated. That said - go through the references provided previously by RotorBez for PMI and FIR itself.

Additional info on references for the PIRC from CASA's site ...
https://www.casa.gov.au/standard-page/p ... ation-pirc
Vorticey
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby Vorticey » Mon May 13 2019, 12:58

Silver Wings, did you do the Exam first?
I'm also looking at doing this PIRC exam, and i've been reading the first link in the second post also, its got to be the most boring thing I've read in aviation in a long time and the worst thing is, I'm learning someone's theories in how people might learn and some of it seems a bit fluffy. Some of it is common sense broken down into way too small a pieces that it also now has become theory's. Why we need to invent a category called higher order thinking or HOTS, instead of calling it 'experience' which is what it basically means, is beyond me.
I did find it ironic that after reading up on the best way for me to learn and instructors to, talk to me, understand what personality I have, teach me knowledge, check my perception is accurate and try and monitor my person for any thing un-toward, Im just going to self study this, and sit on a computer and answer multi-choice questions as usual.
I did find some example questions if anyone is looking:
http://www.dauntless-soft.com/products/ ... nstructor/
professionally unprofessional
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby homersimpson » Mon May 13 2019, 23:33

Vorticey that FAA book is painful.
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CYHeli
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby CYHeli » Tue May 14 2019, 02:27

Hi Tail wind,
Consider doing a Cert IV in training and assessment. It can be done via distance learning and you video tape yourself doing a presentation. During the Instructor Rating you will be doing presentations anyway, so you might as well tape a couple. You can then watch how you have presented and improve on that. Don't tape the first couple unless you have some teaching or presenting experience. Having the Cert IV makes it easier to get a job with a training school that holds an RTO approval. If you don't have the Cert IV, it's a bit hard for them to let you work.

I found that the PMI was a good intro to doing a Cert IV. I did a 1/2 distance, 1/2 classroom course and the classroom was easy having done it for real in aviation.

Good luck, there are some great schools to choose from.
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby Mick Cullen » Wed May 15 2019, 07:35

CYHeli wrote: Having the Cert IV makes it easier to get a job with a training school that holds an RTO approval. If you don't have the Cert IV, it's a bit hard for them to let you work.


That's good advice but not 100% correct in all cases. The requirement is for either a Cert IV (and it has to be the latest version, not a Cert IV you did several ago) or a diploma or higher level qualification in adult education.

Examples of adult education qualifications include:

CASR Part 61 Flight or Simulator Instructor
Army Recruit Instructor
Graduate Diploma in Adult and Vocational Education and Training
Graduate Diploma of Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy
Master of Education or Doctoral degree with an adult education focus.

So RTOs can employ you with a straight instructor rating.

Where it gets tricky is for people going for a theory instructor position. If you are not a flight instructor then you will need a current Cert IV to teach theory at an RTO flight school. There is some leeway if you have supervision from a Cert IV holder but it comes with more hoops to jump through.
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby godfather007 » Wed May 15 2019, 11:04

OMG.
No wonder the aviation sector is lacking for pilots stepping up to Instructors and progressing to the next step on the ladder.
With the above stated credentials, you would be better off going for a Public Servent roll or school teacher and using the spare change to fly for fun on the side.
Passion for flying would be the only draw card the way I see it.
Am I wrong?
Is CA$A to blame?
Happy to be corrected.
GF.
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby Heliflyer » Wed May 15 2019, 13:30

tail wind wrote:Gidday All,

I’m looking at getting my instructor rating in the new year, but wanting to knock the theory over before I get stuck into it. Does anyone have any information/advice on which theory books are worth studying?

Thanks in advance

TW


I'm in the middle of my grade 3 instructor rating, and as well as the usual suspects I've found the book Cyclic and Collective by Shawn Coyle to be a good complement to other materials. It's less heavy on the theory, and more focused on teaching the practical aspects of flying.
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havick
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Re: Instructor rating theory

Postby havick » Wed May 15 2019, 14:20

Mick Cullen wrote:
CYHeli wrote: Having the Cert IV makes it easier to get a job with a training school that holds an RTO approval. If you don't have the Cert IV, it's a bit hard for them to let you work.


That's good advice but not 100% correct in all cases. The requirement is for either a Cert IV (and it has to be the latest version, not a Cert IV you did several ago) or a diploma or higher level qualification in adult education.

Examples of adult education qualifications include:

CASR Part 61 Flight or Simulator Instructor
Army Recruit Instructor
Graduate Diploma in Adult and Vocational Education and Training
Graduate Diploma of Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy
Master of Education or Doctoral degree with an adult education focus.

So RTOs can employ you with a straight instructor rating.

Where it gets tricky is for people going for a theory instructor position. If you are not a flight instructor then you will need a current Cert IV to teach theory at an RTO flight school. There is some leeway if you have supervision from a Cert IV holder but it comes with more hoops to jump through.



Great post and clarification for all.
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